Hadithi Crafts
Products with a story
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OUR STORIES

Lore Defrancq

lorak urhgh

 

HUMANS OF HADITHI

Here we collect stories of the people behind the crafts. The inspiration, the lives, the struggles, the victories. The humans that are behind the 'things' you buy. Over time we hope to collect something to tell and show you about each and every artisan we work with.

 “It is hard to share sad stories from the past as you try to move on, and the people around me have motivated me to do so. I lost my husband in 1990, and my mother in 2014. God has helped me through hard times, and his love makes me happy everyday.” -  Doris Kizaka - Kiteghe Group

“It is hard to share sad stories from the past as you try to move on, and the people around me have motivated me to do so. I lost my husband in 1990, and my mother in 2014. God has helped me through hard times, and his love makes me happy everyday.” - Doris Kizaka - Kiteghe Group

 “My husband died in 2004, by which time we had six children together. Their education took a hit when their father passed away, and some started dropping out of school as early as 2005 to get married. Three of my daughters were married, but all later divorced and returned home with their children. I took the responsibility of taking care of them while their mothers went out to search for casual work every morning.” -  Elpina Kinyala - Bungule

“My husband died in 2004, by which time we had six children together. Their education took a hit when their father passed away, and some started dropping out of school as early as 2005 to get married. Three of my daughters were married, but all later divorced and returned home with their children. I took the responsibility of taking care of them while their mothers went out to search for casual work every morning.” - Elpina Kinyala - Bungule

 “I don’t think my basket skills are as good as the other ladies’ in the group – I need to improve!” -  Gloria Mwashighadi - Kiteghe:  

“I don’t think my basket skills are as good as the other ladies’ in the group – I need to improve!” - Gloria Mwashighadi - Kiteghe: 

 “My greatest achievement is putting my three girls through high school with the income I’ve made from basket weaving. They all have high ambitions now: one wants to be a journalist, one wants to be an accountant and the other a teacher. It makes me very proud.” -  Hannah Paul - Rukanga

“My greatest achievement is putting my three girls through high school with the income I’ve made from basket weaving. They all have high ambitions now: one wants to be a journalist, one wants to be an accountant and the other a teacher. It makes me very proud.” - Hannah Paul - Rukanga

 “I’m originally from Kangudo in Machakos county, and moved to Bungule in 1976 when I got married. My husband retired in 1991, but since then he has not been contributing much to the family as he’s been pursuing mining gold. He’s hardly ever home and hasn’t been successful for the many years he has been there, so my family is left to depend on me.”  “Comparing the men of Bungule and Kangundo, where I’m from, I would say the men from Bungule are very lazy!”-  Josephine Dyo- Bungule

“I’m originally from Kangudo in Machakos county, and moved to Bungule in 1976 when I got married. My husband retired in 1991, but since then he has not been contributing much to the family as he’s been pursuing mining gold. He’s hardly ever home and hasn’t been successful for the many years he has been there, so my family is left to depend on me.”

“Comparing the men of Bungule and Kangundo, where I’m from, I would say the men from Bungule are very lazy!”- Josephine Dyo- Bungule

 “I was in a polygamous marriage for 23 years. My co-wife didn’t like me at all, and disagreements between the two of us started pretty early; she would find blame in anything for me. My husband was good to me and would calm things down for a while, but it kept happening and eventually I couldn’t bare it anymore so I left for peace in my parent’s home. My only son refused to come with me, but my husband supported by decision and continued to support me, and he also took care of our son. He has his own family and homestead now. The last time I saw him was when my husband died ten years ago.”-  Matilda Sezi - Jora

“I was in a polygamous marriage for 23 years. My co-wife didn’t like me at all, and disagreements between the two of us started pretty early; she would find blame in anything for me. My husband was good to me and would calm things down for a while, but it kept happening and eventually I couldn’t bare it anymore so I left for peace in my parent’s home. My only son refused to come with me, but my husband supported by decision and continued to support me, and he also took care of our son. He has his own family and homestead now. The last time I saw him was when my husband died ten years ago.”- Matilda Sezi - Jora

 “When my husband died in 1982, I depended on charcoal burning and farming to maintain my livelihood. But then the government banned the practice of charcoal burning, and farming became so unproductive due to very low rainfall. So I’m very grateful to the customers who buy our baskets as it’s my only source of income.”  “The advice I have for my fellow ladies is to work hard on their basket weaving, educate their children well and respect your customers!”-  Panina Maghanga - Jora

“When my husband died in 1982, I depended on charcoal burning and farming to maintain my livelihood. But then the government banned the practice of charcoal burning, and farming became so unproductive due to very low rainfall. So I’m very grateful to the customers who buy our baskets as it’s my only source of income.”

“The advice I have for my fellow ladies is to work hard on their basket weaving, educate their children well and respect your customers!”- Panina Maghanga - Jora

 “I have five children, and they all make me very happy. My first born is now married and has a big family, and the two youngest still live with me, one of which has just completed secondary school and now wants to go to university. My advice to them would be to love eachother, to respect the community and to live at peace with everyone.”-  Reginah Masholi - Kiteghe

“I have five children, and they all make me very happy. My first born is now married and has a big family, and the two youngest still live with me, one of which has just completed secondary school and now wants to go to university. My advice to them would be to love eachother, to respect the community and to live at peace with everyone.”- Reginah Masholi - Kiteghe

 “I refused to get married and brought my three children up as a single mother. It’s been hard, but feels good to know I did it by myself. My second born is mentally challenged. I sent her to a specialist school but she couldn’t cope and only lasted one term. She stays at home with me and there’s more attention paid to her than anything else. My last born used to be a house girl in Mombasa, but got out of it and went to university to study architecture in Nairobi with the help of my first born who is a teacher. She graduated two years ago. Attending her ceremony was one of the happiest moments in my life.”-  Ruphence Kale - Rukanga

“I refused to get married and brought my three children up as a single mother. It’s been hard, but feels good to know I did it by myself. My second born is mentally challenged. I sent her to a specialist school but she couldn’t cope and only lasted one term. She stays at home with me and there’s more attention paid to her than anything else. My last born used to be a house girl in Mombasa, but got out of it and went to university to study architecture in Nairobi with the help of my first born who is a teacher. She graduated two years ago. Attending her ceremony was one of the happiest moments in my life.”- Ruphence Kale - Rukanga

 "I was born in Kasigau. My mother taught me how to weave baskets. This trade has benefited my life greatly for i can be able to provide my family with food and am able to educate my children and grandchildren. One of the happiest days of my life  in this business is when machines and bricks were brought to build the new social hall." -  Janet - Chairlady of Amani Basket Weavers

"I was born in Kasigau. My mother taught me how to weave baskets. This trade has benefited my life greatly for i can be able to provide my family with food and am able to educate my children and grandchildren. One of the happiest days of my life  in this business is when machines and bricks were brought to build the new social hall." - Janet - Chairlady of Amani Basket Weavers

 "I was born in Kasigau and I joined Amani Basket Weavers so that I may get some money to cater for my family's needs which includes food (of which my favourite is Ugali 😁 ) and educating my children and grandchildren."  Pauline - Amani Basket Weavers

"I was born in Kasigau and I joined Amani Basket Weavers so that I may get some money to cater for my family's needs which includes food (of which my favourite is Ugali 😁 ) and educating my children and grandchildren." Pauline - Amani Basket Weavers

 "I married my husband in 1979 but I've been widowed for 8 years. The basket weaving group has helped me remain more financially stable. With the money I get from selling baskets I was able to pay my children's school fees and buy them uniforms, as well as buy water tanks and solar lights for my home." -  Teresia Mulinge - Kisimenyi Basket Weavers

"I married my husband in 1979 but I've been widowed for 8 years. The basket weaving group has helped me remain more financially stable. With the money I get from selling baskets I was able to pay my children's school fees and buy them uniforms, as well as buy water tanks and solar lights for my home." - Teresia Mulinge - Kisimenyi Basket Weavers

 " I was born in Kasigau. Basket weaving is art I learnt in the earlier years of my life while I was in school. It has served me well, for I have been able to send my children to school from what I earn. One of the major challenges we have as basket weavers is lack of sisal ; the material used to weave the baskets.All in all am am happiest when the baskets I make are purchased." -  Selina, Rukanga Baskets Weavers

" I was born in Kasigau. Basket weaving is art I learnt in the earlier years of my life while I was in school. It has served me well, for I have been able to send my children to school from what I earn. One of the major challenges we have as basket weavers is lack of sisal ; the material used to weave the baskets.All in all am am happiest when the baskets I make are purchased." - Selina, Rukanga Baskets Weavers

 "One of the problems we as basket weavers face is a lack of market. We weave many baskets but we lack customers to sell them to.If this is looked into it will go a long way in improving our standards of living." -  Grace, Amani Basket Weavers

"One of the problems we as basket weavers face is a lack of market. We weave many baskets but we lack customers to sell them to.If this is looked into it will go a long way in improving our standards of living." - Grace, Amani Basket Weavers

 " I learnt how to weave baskets from my mother. I joined Rukanga Basket Weavers because the leaders work for the betterment of their members. The group is hardworking and united and many of my baskets have been sold through my association with them. The profits I get I use to educate my children and buy food for my family."  Eunice - Rukanga

" I learnt how to weave baskets from my mother. I joined Rukanga Basket Weavers because the leaders work for the betterment of their members. The group is hardworking and united and many of my baskets have been sold through my association with them. The profits I get I use to educate my children and buy food for my family." Eunice - Rukanga

 " Amani Basket weavers is a group aimed at uplifting the living standards of women. It has exposed women to matters like table- banking whereby women can access loans from groups they have formed at a reasonable interest rate.From basket weaving I have been able to start a business and keep poultry.   Joyce-  Amani

" Amani Basket weavers is a group aimed at uplifting the living standards of women. It has exposed women to matters like table- banking whereby women can access loans from groups they have formed at a reasonable interest rate.From basket weaving I have been able to start a business and keep poultry.  Joyce-  Amani

  I was born in Marungu. Being a mother and being able to provide for my family brings me a lot of joy. My biggest hope and aspiration is that we can get a lot of customers for our product."  Joyce, Rukanga

 I was born in Marungu. Being a mother and being able to provide for my family brings me a lot of joy. My biggest hope and aspiration is that we can get a lot of customers for our product." Joyce, Rukanga

 "I was born in Ukambani, Machakos County. I was taught basket weaving by my grandmother. Being a mother is everything to me, and the income I get from basket weaving allows me to raise the standard of living for my family, pay for my children's education and meet their daily needs! My other source of income is farming. I aspire to see my children study & lead a life without struggles." -  Regina, Ikonge Basket Weavers. 

"I was born in Ukambani, Machakos County. I was taught basket weaving by my grandmother. Being a mother is everything to me, and the income I get from basket weaving allows me to raise the standard of living for my family, pay for my children's education and meet their daily needs! My other source of income is farming. I aspire to see my children study & lead a life without struggles." - Regina, Ikonge Basket Weavers. 

 "Being a mother brings me so much joy, I enjoy seeing my children grow. The profits I make from basket weaving I use towards paying my children's school fees and food. My favourite thing about the Lukundo group is the unity within the group, their's no hostility between us. I hope life will change for the better!" -  Rofence - Lukundo Basket Weavers

"Being a mother brings me so much joy, I enjoy seeing my children grow. The profits I make from basket weaving I use towards paying my children's school fees and food. My favourite thing about the Lukundo group is the unity within the group, their's no hostility between us. I hope life will change for the better!" - Rofence - Lukundo Basket Weavers

 "I'm originally from Bungule. The group here is really cooperative and friendly. The profits I make from basket weaving I use to fund my clothes business. One of the biggest problems we experience here is the sisal we use for weaving the baskets being eaten by elephants".  Lilian - Ikonge Basket Weavers

"I'm originally from Bungule. The group here is really cooperative and friendly. The profits I make from basket weaving I use to fund my clothes business. One of the biggest problems we experience here is the sisal we use for weaving the baskets being eaten by elephants". Lilian - Ikonge Basket Weavers

 "Outside of the basket weaving group I'm a farmer, here in Taita we're experiencing a lack of rain which is a real problem for farmers like myself. I joined so I could provide for myself rather than being reliant on others. Here we don't just help each other with the basket weaving but also with life advice, we have a wide range of ages that all have their own questions, the old help the young and vice versa. -  Julia, Lukundo Basket Weavers.

"Outside of the basket weaving group I'm a farmer, here in Taita we're experiencing a lack of rain which is a real problem for farmers like myself. I joined so I could provide for myself rather than being reliant on others. Here we don't just help each other with the basket weaving but also with life advice, we have a wide range of ages that all have their own questions, the old help the young and vice versa. - Julia, Lukundo Basket Weavers.